How To Reduce Racism

The Ethan Bearman Show

Tune in to The Ethan Bearman Show, Sundays 7-9 pm Eastern, 6-8 pm Central, 5-7 pm Mountain, 4-6 pm Pacific on your favorite talk radio station or online

The studio number to call-in during the show is 1-800-259-5791 or email me radio@ethanbearman.com

If your local station doesn’t carry the show yet, please be sure to call and ask for them to broadcast The Ethan Bearman Show on Sunday evenings!

Click HERE for a complete listing of affiliates and ways to listen to the shows

Why Elon Musk is a Poor Person’s Worst Nightmare

Good Times

The latest edition of the Santa Cruz Good Times has published and my article, “Why Elon Musk is a Poor Person’s Worst Nightmare” is in the opinion section! Click THIS LINK for their article.

Here is an excerpt:

In the movie Elysium, the wealthy and privileged flee Earth to inhabit a Larry Niven-like artificial ringworld, leaving the rest of humanity behind on a destitute planet. The future, if left to Elon Musk bears an eerie resemblance to Elysium.

Elon Musk, the chief executive officer (CEO) and chief technology officer (CTO) of SpaceX, the CEO of Tesla Motors, and chairman of the board of SolarCity, doesn’t care about the poor or middle-class and his business models prove it.

The technology-centric crowd fawns over Elon Musk like he is the second coming of Steve Jobs. He is a creative problem solver who looks to the future. However, his products serve only the wealthy and elite.

Government support through taxpayer and ratepayer subsidies of a billionaire’s business models is a form of fascism, blind to your labels of liberal and conservative.

There was a recent article in Quartz,”Why Elon Musk is a utility executive’s worst nightmarefawning over SolarCity for upending the traditional power companies. Here is what they are all missing. Only homeowners can lease those solar panels that SolarCity installs. How many low, and even middle income people are homeowners in California? The same California, and particularly Santa Cruz, which is one of the most expensive states and metro areas in the country. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, San Cruz’s homeownership rate is 59.4% and California overall is 56.7% compared to the national average of 66.1%.

Traditional power companies like Pacific Gas & Electric, still maintain the power lines, transformers, substations, and equipment for connecting those houses to the grid, yet SolarCity bears none of those costs. So, the lower to middle income renter subsidizes SolarCity and their customers through higher rates on electricity. Ratepayers in California have spent $1.68 billion on these subsidies to the benefit of SolarCity, competitors of SolarCity, their customers, and other industry players.

How many coal, natural gas, or oil power plants have been removed? Zero. Not one of those polluting plants have been decommissioned in California. One nuclear plant, San Onofre, is being taken off-line and not as a result of solar installations, but actual problems at the plant. The result of San Onofre’s discontinuance of contributing power to the grid is concern over about rolling blackouts.

Click THIS LINK to continue reading

Updated Spreadsheet Salaries Exceeding Federal Pay Scale for Central Coast

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Thanks to the Santa Cruz Sentinel I have added sheets for Santa Cruz County 2012 salaries and Santa Cruz City 2011 salaries.

Take a look, it is an eye opener to see an estimated 32 employees in the city and 39 employees of the county of Santa Cruz exceeding GS pay. Two municipalities that must balance the budget every year, unlike the federal government, busting their budgets on overpaying employees.

UPDATE December 11, 2013 6:40 pm PST

Based upon requests from readers, I have added three new tabs to the spreadsheet with the eye-opening numbers (134 making more than $155k per year) from the University of California Santa Cruz, and the more reasonable California State University Monterey Bay and Cabrillo College (which happens to be one of the very best in the United States).

Click below for the Microsoft Excel format file (new xlsx format)

UCSC_CSUMB_CabrilloCollege_MontereyCo_SantaCruzCo_SantaCruz_CASalariesExceedingFederalLevels

Picasso and Oscar

The Ethan Bearman Show

  • What does the Detroit bankruptcy really mean?
  • Interview with Péri Cochin, international radio and television host on the Picasso auction  with proceeds to help UNESCO site Tyre, Lebanon

    Péri Cochin

    Péri Cochin

  • Court ruling could dramatically change software patents
  • Our electronic cars are susceptible to being stopped
  • Interview with Glenn Whipp of the Los Angeles Times The Envelope discussing the awards season underway and who might win an Oscar

    Glenn Whipp

    Glenn Whipp

 

Tune in to The Ethan Bearman Show, Sundays 7-9 pm Eastern, 6-8 pm Central, 5-7 pm Mountain, 4-6 pm Pacific on your favorite talk radio station or online

The studio number to call-in during the show is 1-800-259-5791 or email me radio@ethanbearman.com

If your local station doesn’t carry the show yet, please be sure to call and ask for them to broadcast The Ethan Bearman Show on Sunday evenings!

Click HERE for a complete listing of affiliates and ways to listen to the shows

More Co-ops Are Needed

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Why don’t places, like Santa Cruz, California, for example, have more co-ops outside of colleges and universities?!?

From the Wikipedia definition of a cooperative:

A cooperative (“coop“) or co-operative (“co-op“) is an autonomous association of persons who voluntarily cooperate for their mutual, social, economic, and cultural benefit.[1] Cooperatives include non-profit community organizations and businesses that are owned and managed by the people who use its services (a consumer cooperative) or by the people who work there (a worker cooperative) or by the people who live there (a housing cooperative), hybrids such as worker cooperatives that are also consumer cooperatives or credit unions, multi-stakeholder cooperatives such as those that bring together civil society and local actors to deliver community needs, and second and third tier cooperatives whose members are other cooperatives.

I lived a good portion of my life in Minnesota where farmer co-ops are giant businesses, controlled by the member farmers, like Cenex and Land O’Lakes. Credit unions are member owned co-ops, act a lot like banks with checking accounts and car loans, and yet credit unions made only one-fourth the number of bad loans compared to the big banks.

Look at what Minneapolis is doing! From a Minneapolis Star Tribune article, “Co-ops boosting retail on Central Avenue in northeast Minneapolis”:

Dan Nordley, a small-business owner who is also a leader in the cooperative movement that has deep roots in Minnesota history, said the success on Central is positive across many fronts.

“Too much business is disproportionately driven by people who just want to make money on money,” he said. “This one is more about providing goods and services to a community that needs it for its general livelihood.”

Co-ops already have set up shop in two other buildings in the area. The first was a co-op grocery, Eastside Food, that opened 10 years ago this week and now boasts 4,475 members. In 2011, some of its members formed Northeast Investment Cooperative (NEIC) to buy, rehab and manage commercial property. It’s now filling its first building at 2504-06 Central.

Co-ops are business owned by the members who shop there. What a great idea for taking control of your own, and community’s destiny when disillusioned with a cold, corporate approach.

I am partial to co-op food stores. There were many good stores in Minnesota like Lakewinds and The Wedge. The best part is they answer to the customer-owner, stocking food that is requested, particularly organic or non-GMO foods, strive for great customer service, and when the store turns a profit a dividend check is issued to each shareholder-customer!

I discussed this on KSCO Presents on November 13, 2013, in light of New Leaf Community Markets in the Santa Cruz area being bought buy a regional chain out of Portland, Oregon, which is owned by a private equity firm. And I wondered aloud on-air why the center of the fresh, local, produce world doesn’t have more co-ops.

We need to consider a nationwide movement of creating customer friendly, community focused businesses that serve the interest of the dual-role customer and shareholder.

What better way to signal Wall Street we are unhappy with their ways?