FNC Tucker Carlson Immigrant Local Voting

Tucker Carlson kindly invited me back on his Fox News Channel show, Friday, July 20, 2018.

Our topic was San Francisco allowing all residents, regardless of immigration status to vote this November in local school board elections.

According to the elections department, non-citizen voting materials are required to have a notice letting the voter know that any information provided to the department may be obtained by the federal government. 

The ordinance will permit non-citizen voting for the Board of Education elections from November of this year through Nov. 2022. After that, the ordinance will expire and supervisors must vote on whether to adopt an ordinance to continue it. 

To be eligible, a non-citizen voter must be a San Francisco resident, 18 years or older and be a parent, legal guardian or caregiver to a child under the age of 19.

Boston is also considering allowing non-citizens to vote in local elections.

The City Council’s Committee on Government Operations is set to have a hearing on Tuesday to discuss the idea of non-U.S. citizens voting in municipal elections.

The council is looking at ways to make city elections more inclusive, such as allowing foreign-born residents with legal status to vote.

According to a 2015 American Community Survey of the U.S. Census Bureau, immigrants make up 28.5% of the city’s population, or roughly 190,000 people. Boston’s immigrants also paid $116 million in state and local taxes, and spent around $3.4 billion according to a 2015 “Boston by the Numbers” report.

Immigrants with legal status in Boston include legal permanent residents, visa holders and those on temporary protected status or deferred action for childhood arrivals. 

Studies show kids have far better educational outcomes when parents are involved.

School and parent/family/community partnerships are associated with positive effects on student outcomes, e.g., higher levels of achievement as measured by standardized test scores; factual, conceptual, critical, and attitudinal aspects of learning

Finally, few people vote in local elections.

voter turnout across neighborhoods corresponds with the distribution of race and income, with whiter and wealthier neighborhoods …showing high turnout

Watch the full segment here:

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