Ethan Explains Politics Money Duopoly 4/20/16

My other barista asked about the accusation of Hillary Clinton campaign money from the Bernie Sanders campaign. I explain how politicians play the money and play on ancient fears, dividing us for their own gain.

From Vice News:

“In a letter to embattled DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Sanders campaign attorney Brad Deutsch questioned whether the Clinton campaign had “violated legal limits on donations” through activities associated with the Hillary Victory Fund. The HVF is a joint fundraising committee, which raises and spends money on behalf of Hillary for America (Clinton’s official campaign committee), the DNC, and 33 state Democratic parties.”

Congratulations to both the Clinton and Trump camps for their wins in New York.

Tune in to my KGO 810 show weekdays noon to 2pm Pacific time online at kgoradio.com

Watch This Video And Tell Me How Washington Doesn’t Need Reform Right Now

This is from CBS 60 Minutes and the segment is called “Washington’s open secret: Profitable PACs”

The complete transcript is HERE

We the people are getting the shaft from the politicians in Washington, D.C. This is both parties, nearly equally. The duopoly in control is the problem. We need reform right NOW. Not later, not someday, reform right now.

Lowlights from this clip:

Georgia Sen. Saxby Chambliss likes golf, so much so that he spent more than $100,000 the past two years entertaining at some of the finest courses in the world. New York congressman Gregory Meeks prefers football. He spent $35,000 on NFL games. All of this was paid for with political contributions — all in the name of democracy.

For example, Democratic Congressman Robert Andrews of New Jersey used $16,000 from his leadership PAC “the committee to strengthen America” to fly his family to Scotland, ostensibly to attend the wedding of a friend that he was thinking about hiring as a political consultant.

Sloan says there are at least 75 members of Congress who have hired members of their family to work on their campaign and paid them with political contributions.

Until Republican Congressman Ron Paul of Texas retired last year he seemed to be the leader with six family members on the campaign payroll — daughter, daughter’s mother in-law, three grandchildren and a grandchild in-law. Paying them a total of $304,000 over the past two election cycles.

But Paul only ranked third in total payouts to family members — behind former Republican Congressman Jerry Lewis and Democratic Congresswoman Maxine Waters both of California.