Happy Rosh Hashanah 5777 Shanah Tova

rosh hashanah 5777

Rosh Hashanah 5777 is the Jewish New Year and literally means “head of the year.” The 5777 is the year count on the lunar Jewish calendar.

Jews don’t say Happy New Year, they hope for a good year.

According to aish.com:

To hope for a happy new year is to give primacy to the ideal of a hedonistic culture whose greatest goal is “to have a good time.” To seek a good year however is to recognize the superiority of meaning over the joy of the moment.

The word “good” has special meaning in the Torah. The first time we find it used is in the series of sentences where God, after each day of creation, views his handiwork and proclaims it “good”. More, when God completed his work he saw all that he had done “and behold it was very good.”

That is the deepest meaning of the word good when it is applied to us and to our lives. We are good when we achieve our purpose; our lives are good when they fulfill what they are meant to be.

We know many people of whom it can be said that they had good lives in spite of their having had to endure great unhappiness. Indeed, the truly great chose lives of sacrifice over pleasure and left a legacy of inspiration and achievement that they never could have accomplished had they been solely concerned with personal gratification.

Today and tomorrow, the shofar will sound in Israel as it has for thousands of years to announce the King and to begin the ten days of repentance culminating in Yom Kippur.

May this Rosh Hashanah 5777 bring your family a good year with sweetness!

L’Shanah Tovah Tikatevu 5775

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Traditional foods served during Rosh HaShanah

May you be inscribed (in the Book of Life) for a good year.

Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year and literally means “head of the year.”

Rabbi Benjamin Blech has an insightful article titled “Jews Don’t Say Happy New Year” on Rosh HaShanah. An excerpt quoting Kathleen Vohs, “”Happy people get joy from receiving benefits from others while people leading meaningful lives get a lot of joy from giving to others.” In other words, meaning transcends the self while happiness is all about giving the self what it wants.”

After a year in which Jew Hatred reared its vile, ugly head across Europe (synagogues firebombed in Germany and Belgium, Jews viciously attacked at a synagogue in France), and around the rest of the world surrounding Israel’s war with Gaza.

Let us all, Jews and Gentiles alike, pray for peace. Pray for people to value life more than death, pray for our children to be the future of goodness, pray for the hate-filled to become love-filled, pray for the angry to let it go, pray for the righteous to shine joyful light on the darkness that lurks and leaps, and pray for leaders to step forward.

In this New Year, may peace, prosperity, and joy find you and your family.